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Divisions in the Democratic Party


Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea

Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.

The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.

 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.

Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.

Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.

What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?

 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.

In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.

The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.

However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.

To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.

Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.

It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.

This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.

Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.

Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.

Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.

 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.

 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.

Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.



Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.

Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.
Divisions in the Democratic Party       Gerry O'Shea
Some commentators assert that the Democratic Party is seriously divided  ideologically, with strong left and right wing factions  clashing over important policy issues as the November congressional elections approach.
The victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the incumbent, Congressman Joe Crowley, in the recent Democratic primary in Queens, New York, is  viewed as a prime example of this division.
 Joe, age 56, was part of the Democratic leadership team in Washington  and was often mentioned as a possible successor for Nancy Pelosi. He was a highly-respected product of traditional machine politics in Queens.
Alexandria, just half his age, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), presented herself as part of new age politics to the left of Crowley and the Democratic Establishment.
Cynthia Nixon, the famous actress and political activist, is running a plucky campaign in the Democratic gubernatorial primary which will be held on September 13th. She is arguing that Governor Cuomo is not sufficiently committed to her version of progressive causes.
What policies are we talking about that reveal this division among Democrats, between left and right?
 The biggest issue facing the country is surely healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is still on the books, but the Republicans have removed the universal mandate and have undermined the Act at every turn. They promised a new Bill that would provide cover for everyone at a reduced cost. We are still waiting.
In fact, the opposite has happened under Trump. Millions of people have lost coverage and insurance bills have increased by close to 20% for many citizens. The Republicans are now talking about removing the Obamacare mandate that requires  insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions.
The Democrats - especially the left wing of the Party - favor a system similar to Medicare  for everyone or some national health insurance arrangement close to the Canadian system.
However, the realpolitik of the situation is that Republicans have majorities in both houses of Congress, and they hate and reject any program of universal coverage with the same venom that the devil  despises holy water. The reality is that Democrats in both houses of Congress are fighting a rearguard battle to preserve what they can of Obamacare.
To implement Medicare-for-all  will require a Democrat in the White House and strong Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives. Hopefully that day will come soon, but in the meantime, the focus  has to be on holding on to the remaining hard-earned gains for vulnerable people in the Affordable Care Act. This strategic imperative clearly applies to all sections of the Party.
Taxes will also feature in people's voting preferences in November. Republican lawmakers celebrated publicly when they passed a budget without  the support of even one Democrat in Congress. They boasted that the tax cuts they enacted would help the middle class and would be so successful in stimulating the economy that the Treasury would see a big boost in tax revenue.
It isn't working that way. Trickle-down economics never works except for the people at the top. The deficit will reach around a massive trillion dollars this year, and the financial benefits from the budget for middle-class taxpayers are so minimal that many Republican candidates are not even mentioning them in their political literature. The word is out that hundreds of billions are flowing  into the pockets of the really affluent - and the richer you are the more you get.
This is red meat for Democrats of all stripes and they will surely condemn the breach of promise by Republicans in this vital family-table issue. They will explain to the electorate why they couldn't support a budget that reverses the Robin Hood philosophy by taking benefits from the poor and middle class to give massive handouts to the plutocrats who already have an abundance.
Mr. Trump's government has promulgated plans to cut the Food Stamp  and other programs in health care and housing for the poor. Democrats should cry foul and promise to end such immoral proposals if they regain a majority in the House.
Women's issues are high in the Democratic agenda, and recent polls show more women candidates representing the party than ever before and also a level of support for Democrats among females over 60% - a really promising statistic for the party.
Most Republicans refuse to even accept the reality of global warming. They dismiss the evidence promulgated by nearly all weather scientists as unconvincing. Congressional leaders Ryan and McConnell cheered President Trump when he, disgracefully, withdrew the United States from the international Paris climate accords.
 In America, cars and trucks are the worst source of  polluting  emissions, and the current  Republican plan is to ease the requirement on manufacturers to reduce the carbon damage to the environment.
 More Americans now reject the belief that the oceans aren't rising and the ice caps aren't melting. They fear for the planet they are bequeathing to their children and grandchildren. This is another very serious issue that should be boldly argued by the right and left of the party.
Turnout is always a problem especially for Democrats in midterm elections. If leading candidates are seen fighting among themselves without a clear and unified message for change, then Republicans may hold both Houses of Congress, a recipe for disaster in the era of  erratic Trumpery.
Democrats are noted for their squabbling, for their inability to agree on  a set of progressive policies. Failing to unite this time on healthcare, taxes and the defense of the poor and the environment may allow the continuation of policies that most supporters of the Party realize are a disaster for the country.















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